HOW TO NATURALLY BALANCING YOUR HORMONES. » Secretgist Media

HOW TO NATURALLY BALANCING YOUR HORMONES.

The body secretes about 50 hormones that control many critical functions including metabolism, homeostasis (balance), sexual activity, and contraction of the heart muscle. Hormones are messenger molecules that one part of your body makes and then transports via the bloodstream. Some hormones are more powerful than others. “Insulin is a such a powerful hormone that five other hormones counterbalance its effects,” says Jonny Bowden, Ph.D. Those five hormones are glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, adrenaline, and noradrenaline.

Hormones also have a circadian rhythm. Cortisol, for instance, is highest in the morning and should gradually taper down throughout the day. Ghrelin, your hunger hormone, is usually highest in the evening just in time for dinner. When levels of these hormones don’t stay in an optimal range, you suffer the consequences of that imbalance. If you have high cortisol levels in the evening, for instance, you might have a wired but tired feeling. No hormone is good or bad. Instead, they should be in balanced levels, which differs for everyone since we are all unique. Estrogens, a group of sex hormones perhaps most critical to a female’s reproductive function and cycle that plays a role in numerous processes including blood sugar balance as well as immune, bone, and heart health. Low or high estrogen levels can contribute to infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and degenerative diseases.

Hormones are interrelated but sometimes oversimplified, underestimating their complexity. Men also produce estrogen, typically classified as a female hormone. Women produce testosterone, a male hormone. In both cases, these hormones are produced in smaller doses. Hormonal imbalances are multi-factorial disorders, meaning they are caused by a combination of factors such as your diet, medical history, genetics, stress levels and exposure to toxins from your environment. A hormone-balancing diet includes the right foods to steady your blood sugar levels and optimize insulin levels. When you support a healthy diet with the right nutrients and lifestyle factors, you can dramatically improve hormone levels.

  1. The body secretes about 50 hormones that control many critical functions including metabolism, homeostasis (balance), sexual activity, and contraction of the heart muscle. Hormones are messenger molecules that one part of your body makes and then transports via the bloodstream. Some hormones are more powerful than others. “Insulin is a such a powerful hormone that five other hormones counterbalance its effects,” says Jonny Bowden, Ph.D. Those five hormones are glucagon, cortisol, growth hormone, adrenaline, and noradrenaline.
    Hormones also have a circadian rhythm. Cortisol, for instance, is highest in the morning and should gradually taper down throughout the day. Ghrelin, your hunger hormone, is usually highest in the evening just in time for dinner. When levels of these hormones don’t stay in an optimal range, you suffer the consequences of that imbalance. If you have high cortisol levels in the evening, for instance, you might have a wired but tired feeling. No hormone is good or bad. Instead, they should be in balanced levels, which differs for everyone since we are all unique. Estrogens, a group of sex hormones perhaps most critical to a female’s reproductive function and cycle that plays a role in numerous processes including blood sugar balance as well as immune, bone, and heart health. Low or high estrogen levels can contribute to infectious, autoimmune, metabolic, and degenerative diseases.
    Hormones are interrelated but sometimes oversimplified, underestimating their complexity. Men also produce estrogen, typically classified as a female hormone. Women produce testosterone, a male hormone. In both cases, these hormones are produced in smaller doses. Hormonal imbalances are multi-factorial disorders, meaning they are caused by a combination of factors such as your diet, medical history, genetics, stress levels and exposure to toxins from your environment. A hormone-balancing diet includes the right foods to steady your blood sugar levels and optimize insulin levels. When you support a healthy diet with the right nutrients and lifestyle factors, you can dramatically improve hormone levels.
  2. Reduce stress: Stress can cause harm on your hormones. Two major hormones affected by stress are cortisol and adrenaline, which is also called epinephrine. Cortisol is known as “the stress hormone” because it helps your body cope with stress over the long term. Adrenaline is the “fight-or-flight” hormone that provides your body with a surge of energy to respond to immediate danger. This can lead to major systemic malfunctions, beginning with our digestive and reproductive systems, which get put on hold while the body wards off suspected danger. When our body is in a state of stress, it simply cannot rebalance hormonal levels if you don’t give it the chance. Engaging in stress-reduction behaviors like meditation, yoga, massage and listening to soothing music can help normalize your levels of the stress hormone cortisol.
  3. Consume healthy fats: Eating a variety of foods high in short, medium and long-chain fatty acids is key to keeping your hormones in check. Your body needs various types of fats to create hormones, including saturated fat and cholesterol. Not only are these essential fats fundamental building blocks for hormone production, but they keep inflammation levels low, boost your metabolism and promote weight loss. Healthy fats have the opposite effect of refined carbohydrates, which lead to inflammation and can mess with the balance of your hormones. High-quality natural fats in your diet may help reduce insulin resistance and appetite. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are unique fats that are taken up directly by the liver for immediate use as energy. They have been shown to reduce insulin resistance in overweight and obese people, as well as in people with diabetes. MCTs are found in coconut oil, palm oil and pure MCT oil. Dairy fats and monounsaturated fat in olive oil and nuts also seem to increase insulin sensitivity, based on studies in healthy adults and those with diabetes, prediabetes, fatty liver and elevated triglycerides. Including healthy natural fats in your diet and avoiding unhealthy trans fats can help reduce insulin resistance and stimulate the production of hormones that help control appetite.
  4. Sleep: Poor sleep has been linked to imbalances of many hormones, including insulin, cortisol, leptin, ghrelin and growth hormone. Sleep disturbances can contribute to numerous problems including hormonal imbalances. Getting optimal sleep levels can be a challenge in today’s plugged-in society. The brain needs uninterrupted sleep that allows it to go through all five stages of each sleep cycle. This is especially important for the release of growth hormone, which occurs mainly at night during deep sleep. To maintain optimal hormonal balance, aim for at least seven hours of high-quality sleep per night.
  5. Exercise regularly: Nothing helps combat chronic stress like regular exercise. Physical activity can strongly influence hormonal health. A major benefit of exercise is its ability to reduce insulin levels and increase insulin sensitivity. Insulin is a hormone that has several functions. One is allowing cells to take up sugar and amino acids from the bloodstream, which are then used for energy and maintaining muscle. High insulin levels have been linked to inflammation, heart disease, diabetes and cancer. Many types of physical activity have been found to increase insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin levels, including aerobic exercise, strength training and endurance exercise. Being physically active may also help boost levels of muscle-maintaining hormones that decline with age, such as testosterone and growth hormone. For people who are unable to perform vigorous exercise, even regular walking may increase these hormone levels, potentially improving strength and quality of life. Performing strength training, aerobics, walking or other forms of physical activity can modify hormone levels in a way that reduces the risk of disease and protects muscle mass during the aging process.
  6. Combat toxicity: We are bombarded daily with chemicals nearly everywhere in the air we breathe, the food we eat, and the products we put on our bodies. Many of these chemicals are considered endocrine or hormone disruptors because they interfere with hormonal production and create wide-ranging damage. Among them include bisphenol A (BPA), found in plastic water bottle and cans, which can disrupt multiple hormonal pathways. Xenoestrogens, chemical compounds that mimic estrogen, can impact testosterone and estrogen production.

 

REGISTER FOR AMAZON MUSIC STREAM MUSIC ANYWHERE CLICK BELOW IMAGE

About the author

Secretgist

Leave a Comment